Commentary

The views expressed by the authors in the Commentary section are not those of Reuters News.

Commentary19 hours ago

A member of the Afghan security forces stands guard next to damaged army vehicles after a Taliban attack in Ghazni city, Afghanistan August 15, 2018. REUTERS/Mustafa Andaleb

On the streets of the city of Ghazni this week, Afghan troops and Taliban fighters battled for the future of Afghanistan.

Commentarya day ago

U.S. President Donald Trump attends a meeting with Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The first round of what U.S. President Donald Trump called “the most biting sanctions ever imposed” against Tehran went into effect on August 7. “Anyone doing business with Iran will NOT be doing business with the United States,” Trump continued, in a tweet posted that morning. An even more damaging second round of U.S. sanctions against the Islamic Republic, reinstated after Washington pulled out of the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, is expected to take effect in November.

Commentary2 days ago

Egyptian soldiers drive by Tahrir square in Cairo, August 6, 2015. The United States provides Egypt with $1.3 billion a year in military assistance. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

August 14 marks the fifth anniversary of the massacre at Cairo’s Rabaa and Nahda Squares, in which Egyptian security forces killed at least 800 supporters of deposed Islamist president Mohamed Mursi and injured thousands more. The Obama administration responded by reviewing military assistance to Egypt and withholding delivery of fighter jets, attack helicopters, tanks, and missiles. Yet Barack Obama eventually yielded to Egyptian complaints and lifted the arms holds, despite the growing repression of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi – minister of defense at the time of the killings – in order “to address the shared challenges to U.S. and Egyptian interests in an unstable region.”

Commentary3 days ago

Britain's former foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, is being investigated for a breach of conduct by the UK's ruling Conservative Party after likening burqa-wearing Muslim women to bank robbers. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Two men of influence – the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and the politician Boris Johnson – now face media bans and/or ridicule for what they saw as speaking their minds. Both, though quite different in background, manner and actions, are pioneers in the new politics.

Commentary6 days ago

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers address asylum-seekers at Paso del Norte international border crossing bridge in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

President Donald Trump wants to end asylum for Central Americans to keep his campaign promise of halting immigration along the southwest U.S. border. Yet that goal runs afoul of U.S. immigration law, which allows people to enter the United States to seek asylum if they are at a U.S. port of entry or already in the country.

Commentary8 days ago

China's President Xi Jinping addresses the BRICS Summit in Johannesburg, South Africa, July 26, 2018. Gulshan Khan/Pool via REUTERS

Ten years ago on Wednesday, the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics showcased a fast-growing, economically powerful China with unmistakable ambitions to be a major global player. Just a few days ago, the Chinese authorities demolished the studio of artist Ai Weiwei, designer of the Games' iconic “bird’s nest” stadium and now an exiled dissident in Germany. It was the latest sign of how the world’s most populous country has evolved under President Xi Jinping – simultaneously more self-confident yet paranoid, and no longer nearly so bothered what the rest of the world thinks.

Commentary10 days ago

A China Shipping container is loaded at a terminal Hamburg, Germany July 27, 2018. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

If you want to know why Donald Trump shouldn’t expect to win a trade war against China, look no further than Alibaba, the country’s giant e-commerce version of Amazon. Last month, I had two in-depth conversations with Ming Zeng, the e-commerce giant’s head of strategic planning and among the smartest minds in business and finance in China. Ming made it clear that China has little real need for America any more – not U.S. products, but especially not U.S. ideas. When thwarted, China has shown it can think up its own.

Commentary10 days ago

French far-right politician Marine Le Pen and former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon appear together at the National Front political party's convention in Lille, March 10, 2018. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

The various movements gathered under the name of Europe’s “far right” have not risen like a straight line on a graph. There have been – still are – lows as well as highs. Yet there is a new sense of purpose, thanks to a new movement – called “The Movement,” and launched by former Donald Trump aide Steve Bannon – and to Hungarian premier Viktor Orban’s call to the right to “concentrate our strength” on the May 2019 elections to the European Parliament.

Commentary13 days ago

Workers charge electric buses at a Sinopec charging station for electric vehicles in Puyang, China. May 16, 2018. REUTERS

The Trump administration on Thursday took a giant step backward on transportation innovation by issuing a proposal to freeze federal rules requiring automakers to design more efficient, cleaner-running cars. In April, then-Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt called the current standards “too high” and said they did not “comport with reality.” But globally, these standards have helped American automakers to remain competitive as other countries – particularly China – embrace the transition to a low-carbon economy. By reversing course on fuel-efficiency regulations, the United States is encouraging automakers to build outdated vehicles in a globally-evolving market – ceding market leadership to China in the process.

Commentary15 days ago

Palestinians react to tear gas fired by Israeli troops during a protest at the Israel-Gaza border, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa

Israel and Gaza are increasingly alternating between ceasefires and gunfire. This violent instability – the worst in four years – isn’t surprising, as each side inches closer to war while hoping their provocations will make the other side back down. It’s a classic form of brinkmanship – and understanding this strategy means understanding just how easy it is for the situation to unintentionally spin out of both sides' control.

Commentary16 days ago

Military forces are seen in North Sinai, Egypt, December 1, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Reports of Islamic State’s demise are premature. While its core territory in Syria and Iraq is nearly gone, it maintains at least eight branches operating from Nigeria to Pakistan. Of these, the group’s presence in Egypt’s strategic Sinai Peninsula is arguably most worrisome, as sustained operations from there could undermine Egypt’s internal security, threaten regional allies such as Israel and Jordan, and disrupt shipping through the Suez Canal.

Commentary20 days ago

French President Emmanuel Macron arrives to deliver a speech at a debate on the future of Europe at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

Liberal democratic institutions and states are under sustained pressure, from outside and from within. The question now is how well liberal and democratic defenses can withstand the onslaught.

Commentary20 days ago

Supporters of Kem Sokha, former opposition leader and ex-president of the now-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), hold up a poster near the Appeal Court in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, March 27, 2018. REUTERS/Samrang Pring

For over three decades, Cambodia's authoritarian government has consolidated and expanded its power on a foundation of corrupt, faux-democratic rule and unbalanced, “urban-led” economic growth. But in recent months, with pivotal national elections slated for July 29, the administration of Hun Sen – the world's longest-serving prime minister – has abandoned even the pretense of liberalism.

Commentary21 days ago

Iranian women protest in Tehran against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the 2015 multinational nuclear deal, May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Tasnim News Agency

While the world has been focusing on Donald Trump’s summits with NATO and Russia’s Vladimir Putin, tensions are escalating dangerously between Washington and Tehran. On Sunday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani cautioned his U.S. counterpart not to “play with the lion’s tail.” Using the harshest words of his presidency, Rouhani told a gathering of Iranian diplomats that “America should know peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all wars.” Trump responded by tweeting that Iran should “NEVER EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN.”

Commentary24 days ago

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani has warned U.S. President Donald Trump that 'war with Iran is the mother of all wars.' REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

The exodus of international firms from Iran is accelerating as the August deadline for the re-imposition of U.S. sanctions against Tehran approaches. President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the multinational Joint Comprehensive Place of Action, which lifted international sanctions against Iran in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program, has left the 2015 accord hanging dangerously in the balance.

Commentary24 days ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin prepare to leave a joint news conference following their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

Donald Trump cannot be, and perhaps never wished to be, the leader of the free world, the burden which has fallen on the shoulders of Oval Office occupants since World War Two. America First means America Withdrawn.

Commentarya month ago

A view of the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., January 20, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

After Donald Trump appeared to side with Vladimir Putin over the U.S. intelligence community's conclusion that Moscow meddled in the 2016 U.S. election, Congressional Republicans finally spoke out. Days later, with even senior Republican senators apparently eager to accept Trump’s claim that he misspoke after his Helsinki meeting with the Russian leader, that initial forceful response has devolved into the foreign policy equivalent of the “thoughts and prayers” offered after school shootings. But Congress need not just be a spectator, cheering or heckling from the stands.

Commentarya month ago

Shi'ite Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) members hold an Islamic State flag captured during a battle against Islamic State militants in Tal Afar, Iraq August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani

At his post-summit press conference with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on Monday, Donald Trump praised the U.S.-led coalition's “successful campaign” that had “just about eradicated” Islamic State in Syria. IS, however, is far from dead in the region.

Commentarya month ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

The foundations of American national security are under assault. The battle lines are drawn. On one side stand the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency. On the other: the commander-in-chief of the United States.

Commentarya month ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

I remember when as an American diplomat I realized my White House was no longer credible. We may be at that same point in the Trump presidency.

Commentary19 hours ago

A member of the Afghan security forces stands guard next to damaged army vehicles after a Taliban attack in Ghazni city, Afghanistan August 15, 2018. REUTERS/Mustafa Andaleb

On the streets of the city of Ghazni this week, Afghan troops and Taliban fighters battled for the future of Afghanistan.

Commentarya day ago

U.S. President Donald Trump attends a meeting with Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The first round of what U.S. President Donald Trump called “the most biting sanctions ever imposed” against Tehran went into effect on August 7. “Anyone doing business with Iran will NOT be doing business with the United States,” Trump continued, in a tweet posted that morning. An even more damaging second round of U.S. sanctions against the Islamic Republic, reinstated after Washington pulled out of the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, is expected to take effect in November.

Commentary2 days ago

Egyptian soldiers drive by Tahrir square in Cairo, August 6, 2015. The United States provides Egypt with $1.3 billion a year in military assistance. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

August 14 marks the fifth anniversary of the massacre at Cairo’s Rabaa and Nahda Squares, in which Egyptian security forces killed at least 800 supporters of deposed Islamist president Mohamed Mursi and injured thousands more. The Obama administration responded by reviewing military assistance to Egypt and withholding delivery of fighter jets, attack helicopters, tanks, and missiles. Yet Barack Obama eventually yielded to Egyptian complaints and lifted the arms holds, despite the growing repression of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi – minister of defense at the time of the killings – in order “to address the shared challenges to U.S. and Egyptian interests in an unstable region.”

Commentary3 days ago

Britain's former foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, is being investigated for a breach of conduct by the UK's ruling Conservative Party after likening burqa-wearing Muslim women to bank robbers. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Two men of influence – the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and the politician Boris Johnson – now face media bans and/or ridicule for what they saw as speaking their minds. Both, though quite different in background, manner and actions, are pioneers in the new politics.

Commentary6 days ago

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers address asylum-seekers at Paso del Norte international border crossing bridge in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

President Donald Trump wants to end asylum for Central Americans to keep his campaign promise of halting immigration along the southwest U.S. border. Yet that goal runs afoul of U.S. immigration law, which allows people to enter the United States to seek asylum if they are at a U.S. port of entry or already in the country.

Commentary8 days ago

China's President Xi Jinping addresses the BRICS Summit in Johannesburg, South Africa, July 26, 2018. Gulshan Khan/Pool via REUTERS

Ten years ago on Wednesday, the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics showcased a fast-growing, economically powerful China with unmistakable ambitions to be a major global player. Just a few days ago, the Chinese authorities demolished the studio of artist Ai Weiwei, designer of the Games' iconic “bird’s nest” stadium and now an exiled dissident in Germany. It was the latest sign of how the world’s most populous country has evolved under President Xi Jinping – simultaneously more self-confident yet paranoid, and no longer nearly so bothered what the rest of the world thinks.

Commentary10 days ago

A China Shipping container is loaded at a terminal Hamburg, Germany July 27, 2018. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

If you want to know why Donald Trump shouldn’t expect to win a trade war against China, look no further than Alibaba, the country’s giant e-commerce version of Amazon. Last month, I had two in-depth conversations with Ming Zeng, the e-commerce giant’s head of strategic planning and among the smartest minds in business and finance in China. Ming made it clear that China has little real need for America any more – not U.S. products, but especially not U.S. ideas. When thwarted, China has shown it can think up its own.

Commentary10 days ago

French far-right politician Marine Le Pen and former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon appear together at the National Front political party's convention in Lille, March 10, 2018. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

The various movements gathered under the name of Europe’s “far right” have not risen like a straight line on a graph. There have been – still are – lows as well as highs. Yet there is a new sense of purpose, thanks to a new movement – called “The Movement,” and launched by former Donald Trump aide Steve Bannon – and to Hungarian premier Viktor Orban’s call to the right to “concentrate our strength” on the May 2019 elections to the European Parliament.

Commentary13 days ago

Workers charge electric buses at a Sinopec charging station for electric vehicles in Puyang, China. May 16, 2018. REUTERS

The Trump administration on Thursday took a giant step backward on transportation innovation by issuing a proposal to freeze federal rules requiring automakers to design more efficient, cleaner-running cars. In April, then-Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt called the current standards “too high” and said they did not “comport with reality.” But globally, these standards have helped American automakers to remain competitive as other countries – particularly China – embrace the transition to a low-carbon economy. By reversing course on fuel-efficiency regulations, the United States is encouraging automakers to build outdated vehicles in a globally-evolving market – ceding market leadership to China in the process.

Commentary15 days ago

Palestinians react to tear gas fired by Israeli troops during a protest at the Israel-Gaza border, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa

Israel and Gaza are increasingly alternating between ceasefires and gunfire. This violent instability – the worst in four years – isn’t surprising, as each side inches closer to war while hoping their provocations will make the other side back down. It’s a classic form of brinkmanship – and understanding this strategy means understanding just how easy it is for the situation to unintentionally spin out of both sides' control.

Commentary16 days ago

Military forces are seen in North Sinai, Egypt, December 1, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Reports of Islamic State’s demise are premature. While its core territory in Syria and Iraq is nearly gone, it maintains at least eight branches operating from Nigeria to Pakistan. Of these, the group’s presence in Egypt’s strategic Sinai Peninsula is arguably most worrisome, as sustained operations from there could undermine Egypt’s internal security, threaten regional allies such as Israel and Jordan, and disrupt shipping through the Suez Canal.

Commentary20 days ago

French President Emmanuel Macron arrives to deliver a speech at a debate on the future of Europe at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

Liberal democratic institutions and states are under sustained pressure, from outside and from within. The question now is how well liberal and democratic defenses can withstand the onslaught.

Commentary20 days ago

Supporters of Kem Sokha, former opposition leader and ex-president of the now-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), hold up a poster near the Appeal Court in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, March 27, 2018. REUTERS/Samrang Pring

For over three decades, Cambodia's authoritarian government has consolidated and expanded its power on a foundation of corrupt, faux-democratic rule and unbalanced, “urban-led” economic growth. But in recent months, with pivotal national elections slated for July 29, the administration of Hun Sen – the world's longest-serving prime minister – has abandoned even the pretense of liberalism.

Commentary21 days ago

Iranian women protest in Tehran against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the 2015 multinational nuclear deal, May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Tasnim News Agency

While the world has been focusing on Donald Trump’s summits with NATO and Russia’s Vladimir Putin, tensions are escalating dangerously between Washington and Tehran. On Sunday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani cautioned his U.S. counterpart not to “play with the lion’s tail.” Using the harshest words of his presidency, Rouhani told a gathering of Iranian diplomats that “America should know peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all wars.” Trump responded by tweeting that Iran should “NEVER EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN.”

Commentary24 days ago

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani has warned U.S. President Donald Trump that 'war with Iran is the mother of all wars.' REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

The exodus of international firms from Iran is accelerating as the August deadline for the re-imposition of U.S. sanctions against Tehran approaches. President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the multinational Joint Comprehensive Place of Action, which lifted international sanctions against Iran in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program, has left the 2015 accord hanging dangerously in the balance.

Commentary24 days ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin prepare to leave a joint news conference following their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

Donald Trump cannot be, and perhaps never wished to be, the leader of the free world, the burden which has fallen on the shoulders of Oval Office occupants since World War Two. America First means America Withdrawn.

Commentarya month ago

A view of the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., January 20, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

After Donald Trump appeared to side with Vladimir Putin over the U.S. intelligence community's conclusion that Moscow meddled in the 2016 U.S. election, Congressional Republicans finally spoke out. Days later, with even senior Republican senators apparently eager to accept Trump’s claim that he misspoke after his Helsinki meeting with the Russian leader, that initial forceful response has devolved into the foreign policy equivalent of the “thoughts and prayers” offered after school shootings. But Congress need not just be a spectator, cheering or heckling from the stands.

Commentarya month ago

Shi'ite Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) members hold an Islamic State flag captured during a battle against Islamic State militants in Tal Afar, Iraq August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani

At his post-summit press conference with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on Monday, Donald Trump praised the U.S.-led coalition's “successful campaign” that had “just about eradicated” Islamic State in Syria. IS, however, is far from dead in the region.

Commentarya month ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

The foundations of American national security are under assault. The battle lines are drawn. On one side stand the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency. On the other: the commander-in-chief of the United States.

Commentarya month ago

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

I remember when as an American diplomat I realized my White House was no longer credible. We may be at that same point in the Trump presidency.

0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below
taringa.net, kooora.com, kinopoisk.ru, elmundo.es, eonline.com, xe.com, styletv.com.cn, sabah.com.tr, ce.cn, naukri.com,